Gender workshop - UNECE–Global Water Partnership ADA June 23, 2021
Electricity

Serbia’s coal-fired thermal power plants to keep working until 2050

Serbia s coal fired thermal power plants keep working 2050

Published

May 27, 2021

Country

Comments

0

Share

Published:

May 27, 2021

Country:

Comments:

0

Share

Minister of Mining and Energy Zorana Mihajlović said a plan would be developed for the operation of thermal power plants in Serbia until 2050 as new energy production capacities must be sustainable and cost-effective.

The decision of the Ministry of Mining and Energy of Serbia to stop the construction of thermal power plant Kolubara B prompted a strong public reaction. After receiving the letter, state-owned coal mine and power plant operator Elektroprivreda Srbije (EPS) opposed the decision, and so did the members of the trade union of the Kolubara mining basin, which held a protest. The union claimed thermal power plants would be shut down by 2030 and that it would make electricity imports surge and lead to massive layoffs.

Many European Union member countries determined the deadline for a coal exit as the administration in Brussels declared it would become climate neutral by 2050.

Thermal power plants won’t be closed

“I really believe that we will very soon finish the plan for the operation of our thermal power plants by 2050. Therefore, thermal power plants won’t be closed, if this is the main issue that we are hearing these days. The question is how we will make the thermal power plants capable to produce electricity in a sustainable way,” Mihajlović told RTS.

We have to take care of expenses that the CO2 tax will bring for the thermal power plant business

She stressed the ministry isn’t in favor of building thermal power plants and expressed the opinion that it isn’t reasonable, arguing that Serbia should turn to healthier and more sustainable ways to produce energy and be careful about the costs that would be introduced with carbon dioxide surcharges.

“Everything that thermal power plant Kolubara B would produce, most income would be spent on CO2 surcharges, because of pollution. The surcharges are now at EUR 51 per ton of carbon. They were at EUR 35 at the beginning of the year, and they are expected to reach EUR 130 by the end of the year. If we know we will have to cover the surcharges for the energy from new thermal power plants, than it is very questionable whether we should build them, if we know that we would then pay even more,” she told Happy TV.

In her words, the new capacities that Serbia would install will mostly consist of mid-sized and large hydropower plants, gas-fueled power plants, solar and wind power plants.

Comments (0)

Be the first one to comment on this article.

Enter Your Comment

Please wait... Please fill in the required fields. There seems to be an error, please refresh the page and try again. Your comment has been sent.

Related Articles

Slovenia's mayors set council to secure just transition for coal phaseout

Slovenia’s mayors set council to secure just transition for coal phaseout

22 June 2021 - The government has published action plans for phasing out coal, documents which will help Slovenia to apply at Just transition fund.

Turkey guarantees of origin electricity

Turkey rolls out system for guarantees of origin of electricity

21 June 2021 - Power producers and consumers in Turkey can now certify electricity from renewable sources including a trading system for guarantees of origin

EPCG is not on sale, to seek partners for joint investments in green energy - government

EPCG not to be sold, seeking joint investments in green energy – government

21 June 2021 - State-owned power utility Elektroprivreda Crne Gore will not be privatized, according to the Ministry of Capital Investments.

Electricity prices for companies are rising - how consumers can ease burden

20 to 50 percent increase of electricity price for companies in Serbia – how businesses can ease this burden?

18 June 2021 - Serbia has been delaying the energy transition for years, but the impact of the energy transition in the EU has spilled over to the country through the electricity prices for businesses.