Electricity

Securing EU money for Bulgaria’s energy transition will be difficult without coal phaseout date

Securing EU money for Bulgaria's energy transition will be difficult without coal phaseout date

Photo: Alexander Droeger from Pixabay

Published

August 9, 2021

Country

Comments

0

Share

Published:

August 9, 2021

Country:

Comments:

0

Share

If Bulgaria doesn’t set a year for abandoning the production of electricity in coal-fired power plants, it will be difficult to obtain money from the Just Transition Fund, managed by the European Commission, said Professor Koso Stoychev, Head of the Department of Regional and Political Geography at the Faculty of Geology and Geography at Sofia University St. Kliment Ohridski.

Bulgaria has so far refused to accelerate coal phaseout plans as it stuck to the European Union’s final 2050 deadline, but according to the analysis by media outlet Kapital.ba, measures and investments envisaged by the National Recovery and Resilience Plan may lead to the country’s rapid coal exit, by 2025.

Slovakia, Romania and Greece have set dates for phasing out coal, and Bulgaria must do the same

Speaking for Bloomberg TV Bulgaria, Professor Koso Stoychev said Slovakia, Romania and Greece have set an exact date for phasing out coal, and that Bulgaria must do the same.

Without a deadline, the country will have difficulties in absorbing funds from the Just Transition Fund, he said, adding that the European Commission expects the Bulgarian government to set a coal exit date to provide cash.

In late 2020 the EU agreed to launch the Just Transition Fund worth EUR 17.5 billion to help member states with coal-dependent regions to transition toward green energy. A number of states such as Slovenia are already preparing plans to use these funds.

Stoychev: Bulgaria will abandon coal in five years at most

Professor Koso Stoychev said the production of energy from coal must end because it harms the environment. He added every energy system in the history of mankind, four so far, had a beginning and an end. The first was water, the second coal, the third was oil, and the fourth was nuclear energy, in his view.

The fifth energy system is based on renewable energy sources and hydrogen, so coal must stop being used as fuel in Europe, Stoychev said.

He stressed the period until the coal phaseout year, which he believes would not be longer than five years, should be used to create alternative energy sources in order to prepare for the transition of the entire economic structure to another type of energy system.

Comments (0)

Be the first one to comment on this article.

Enter Your Comment
Please wait... Please fill in the required fields. There seems to be an error, please refresh the page and try again. Your comment has been sent.

Related Articles

Kosovo Supreme Court three Kelag small hydropower plants must be shut down belaja ulrich eichelmann

Kosovo* Supreme Court: Kelag’s three small hydropower plants must be shut down

19 October 2021 - The facilities are owned by KelKos, a subsidiary of Austria-based Kelag-Kärntner Elektrizitäts and Kelag International.

Timmermans place for gas nuclear energy EU mix

Timmermans: There is place for gas, nuclear energy in EU energy mix

18 October 2021 - The European Commission's Frans Timmermans said gas has a future in the energy mix and that EU has nothing against nuclear energy

Serbia will not limit electricity prices due to energy crisis - prime minister

Serbia won’t cap electricity prices in response to energy crisis – prime minister

18 October 2021 - Prime Minister Ana Brnabić has said the government would not limit the prices of electricity, which the business sector requested.

Serbia power utility EPS investments in green energy

Serbia’s power utility EPS announces investments in green energy

15 October 2021 - Serbian state-owned power producer EPS aims to install 240 MW in solar power plants and 100 MW in wind farms by the end of the decade