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HEP to start construction of woodchip-fired CHP unit in Osijek

Published

November 6, 2015

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Published:

November 6, 2015

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A building permit for a woodchip-fired combined heat and power plant (CHP) in Osijek was secured by HEP Group, a state-owned energy utility, SeeNews reported. The company plans to launch construction works in December, the Croatian Ministry of Economy said.

Trial should start in early 2017 with the EUR 16.25 million power plant seen fully operational by the spring of the same year, the statement said, after economy minister Ivan Vrdoljak visited the site of the future plant. The CHP unit, which will have annual electricity generation of 16.5 GWh a year, industrial steam production of 32,400 tonnes and thermal energy production of 53.2 GWh a year, will be built at the site of the existing thermal power plant TPP.

HEP group owns and operates over 4 GW of installed generation capacity and 974 MW of heat production, including 25 hydroelectric plants and eight thermal power plants fired by oil, natural gas or coal, the report said.

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