Mobility

Croatia subsidizes purchase of electric buses for public transport

Croatia-subsidizes-purchase-of-electric-buses-for-public-transport

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Published

October 5, 2020

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Published:

October 5, 2020

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For the first time, Croatia’s Environmental Protection and Energy Efficiency Fund (FZOEU) will co-finance the procurement of electric and hydrogen-fuelled buses for public transport in urban areas in order to reduce air pollution.

Numerous analyses and studies have shown electric buses are more cost effective and environmentally friendly, but almost all cities in the region continue to purchase buses on fossil fuels – diesel and compressed natural gas, despite extreme air pollution.

Initiatives to co-finance electric buses in public transport are rare, so the decision by Croatia’s fund must be welcomed.

Although they have huge problems with air pollution, cities in the region continue to purchase buses that run on fossil fuels

Some of the benefits from electric buses should be mentioned. Fuel expenses for a diesel bus are four to five times higher than for an electric bus, and even if an electric bus uses electricity generated in fossil fuel power plants, its emissions are lower. But it isn’t enough for the authorities in the cities in the region.

The fund intends to support the procurement of buses with zero emissions

In the public call for co-financing the purchase of energy-efficient vehicles using alternative fuel for public city transport, Croatia’s fund said the intention is to support the procurement of buses with electricity and hydrogen with zero emissions.

The goal of the public call is to increase energy efficiency in public transport while reducing harmful emissions into the air and preventing pollution, the statement reads.

Eligible for co-financing are local municipalities and their companies for public transport. They can receive a maximum of 40% of costs or EUR 5.3 million. The total available amount is EUR 13.2 million.

Buses must have more than eight seats and must not weigh more than five tonnes.

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