Renewables

Montenegro to start phasing out feed-in tariffs for renewables in 2020

Photo: Montenegrin Government

Published

December 25, 2018

Country

Comments

0

Share

Published:

December 25, 2018

Country:

Comments:

0

Share

The Government of Montenegro has decided to start gradually reducing feed-in tariffs for renewable energy sources as of January 1, 2020, and announced it will continue to promote the construction of wind farms, solar power plants, and large hydropower plants without guaranteed incentive prices, Montenegrin media reported.

The government has adopted regulations that will put an end to financial incentives for renewables, and also limit the fee households pay for incentivizing this type of electricity generation, Economy Minister Dragica Sekulić has said, adding that the customers’ bills for the consumption of up to 300 kWh will not increase in coming years.

The government has adopted the Decree on the method of qualifying for and the amount of incentive prices for electricity produced from renewable energy sources and high-efficient cogeneration, which scraps the Decree on the tariff system for determining the incentive prices for electricity produced from renewable energy sources and high-efficient cogeneration, and also amended the Decree on incentive fees to encourage production from renewable energy sources and high-efficient cogeneration.

Sekulić said that the decrees were adopted after an analysis of current trends in this sector and practical confirmations that further renewable energy development of in Montenegro is possible without the incentives.

In its 2018 report on Montenegro, published in April, the European Commission said that in 2016, 41.6% of energy gross final consumption came from renewable sources, exceeding the 33% target for 2020.

The country needs to switch to an auction system compliant with the 2014-2020 Guidelines on State aid for environmental protection and energy, the European Commission suggested.

First tendering procedure to be for windfarm

At the same session, the government decided not to issue energy licenses in the upcoming period, nor grant concessions for the construction of small hydropower plants (SHPPs).

The Ministry of Economy will continue to promote the construction of windfarms, solar power plants, and large hydropower plants without guaranteed incentive prices, Economy Minister Dragica Sekulić said.

According to her, the next public call for the construction of a power plant is planned for the end of the first quarter of 2019.

At the end of October, Montenegrin Prime Minister Duško Marković announced fresh tendering procedures for the leasing of state land intended for the construction of power plants using renewable energy sources.

The first will be a tendering procedure for the construction of a wind farm in the continental part of the Bar and Budva municipalities, he added.

Comments (0)

Be the first one to comment on this article.

Enter Your Comment
Please wait... Please fill in the required fields. There seems to be an error, please refresh the page and try again. Your comment has been sent.

Related Articles

Expansion of green hydrogen changes geopolitical relations

Expansion of green hydrogen changes geopolitical relations – IRENA

18 January 2022 - Green hydrogen could cover up to 12 percent of global energy consumption in 2050, according...

Romanian RCE exchange platform for bilateral power supply contracts

Romanian Commodity Exchange to roll out platform for bilateral power supply contracts

17 January 2022 - Power purchase agreements were centralized within Romanian TSO Transelectrica's OPCOM market until a recent government directive

Albania has 660 mW of solar projects in the pipeline

Albania has 570 MW of solar projects in pipeline

17 January 2022 - The Energy Regulatory Authority, relevant ministry and environment agency are busy with procedures for a trove of solar projects

iea electricity report 2022 prices

IEA: Rising demand for electricity could result in high prices over next three years

14 January 2022 - Average wholesale electricity prices in Europe in the fourth quarter of 2021 were more than four times as high as their 2015-2020 average