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EIHP exploring geothermal energy helped by Norway

Published

April 21, 2016

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Published:

April 21, 2016

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In the next months Energy Institute Hrvoje Požar (EIHP) will explore possibilities for increased using of geothermal energy in Croatia, portal Poslovni.hr reported. Ministry of Regional Development and European funds announced a contract for a EUR 100,000 grant from the Fund for Bilateral Relations financed by the Government of Norway.

The institute will cooperate with the National Energy Authority of Iceland on the project, as well as on organizing a conference on geothermal energy in Croatia. Iceland is the leader in using geothermal energy through power plants and its electricity generation surpasses domestic needs, the article said.

Goran Granić, director at Energy Institute Hrvoje Požar, was warning for years on low utilization of geothermal potentials, which are abundant in Croatia, the portal said. One of the richest thermal springs, with inlet temperature of 141 degrees Celsius, enough to build a power plant, is located near village Rečice.

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