News

Cretan interconnection plan scaled back

Published

December 21, 2015

Comments

0

Share

Published:

December 21, 2015

Comments:

0

Share

The Independent Power Transmission Operator (IPTO or Admie SA) cut back on the scale of its interconnection plan intended to link Crete with the grid serving the wider Athens area and, for the time being, will connect the island as far north as the Peloponnese, according to sources of Energy Press portal.

The operator is striving to finalize the revised latter project’s details for inclusion in its ten-year plan, the report said. The initial plan, offering a capacity of 1 GW, would have covered electricity supply needs from the mainland to Crete, while also serving as a channel for the supply of the island’s renewable energy production from to the capital city’s area.

Following the revision, the project will, for its initial stage, be limited to a 2 x 200 MW system connecting the Peloponnese with Crete to cover the island’s electricity needs. The resulting infrastructure will not be able to facilitate delivery of Cretan green power production to Athens. This will require development of a supplementary project, according to Energy Press.

Related Articles

IHC 50 Kalyon renewable energy 1 GW solar park

IHC buys 50% of Kalyon’s renewable energy branch including 1 GW solar park

12 August 2022 - IHC) from Abu Dhabi will pay USD 490 million to take over 50% of Kalyon Energy and participate in new solar and wind power projects

clean-hydrogen

Bulgarian town plans clean hydrogen industrial zone

12 August 2022 - The Razgrad municipality in Bulgaria plans to develop an industrial zone that will use clean hydrogen produced with solar power

iberdrola-solar-power-plant-francisco-pizarro

Spain’s Iberdrola puts Europe’s largest solar power plant into operation

12 August 2022 - Iberdrola's solar power plant in western Spain has 1.5 million solar panels and an installed capacity of 590 MW

Scientists warn rainwater unsafe to drink

Scientists warn rainwater is unsafe to drink

11 August 2022 - The levels of so-called forever chemicals in rainwater exceed the most stringent standards developed by health and environmental agencies