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Share of renewables in buildings to reach two thirds

Published

October 29, 2015

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Published:

October 29, 2015

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To reach the target of reduction in energy consumption of 15% by 2020 and 30% by 2030, compared to 2005 levels, overall investments in buildings should be EUR 350–450 million a year or EUR 6.7 billion in total, according to the strategy adopted by the Government of Slovenia, STA said. The document forsees that homeowners will cover three quarters of the outlays, while the private services and public sector will contribute 15% and 10% of the funds, respectively, The Slovenia Times reported.

At least two-thirds of energy used by buildings should come from renewable sources. Emissions of carbon dioxide attributed to buildings would be reduced by 60% by 2020 and 70% by 2030, the article said. This will require insulating and retrofitting between 1.3 and 1.7 million square metres of buildings each year. These are just intermediate targets on the way to the ultimate objective of achieving zero carbon emissions from buildings by 2050, the article said.

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