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Installing of underwater cable soon to be continued

Published

August 27, 2015

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Published:

August 27, 2015

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After getting approval from Croatia to lay the underwater power cable in its waters, there are no other obstacles to continue the energy project to connect Montenegro and Italy.

Dnevne novine, daily newspaper, learned the continuation of installing the 250 kilometres of cable, which will eventually be connected to the power station under construction in Lastva Grbaljska, is expected soon. According to projections of the Montenegrin Electrical Transmission System (CGES), which is implementing this project together with Italian Terna SpA, the power cable from Montenegro to Italy will be operational in early 2017, CdM portal reported.
In mid-November 2010, the contract for the project to link Italy and Montenegro via power cable was signed. The agreement was signed between the then minister of economy of Montenegro Branko Vujović, president of the Board of Directors of CGES Zoran Đukanović, and the chief executive of Terna Flavio Cattaneo. The project is worth around EUR 1 billion, and Montenegro participates with EUR 100 million.

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