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IC İçtaş acquires Kadıncık hydropower plants

Published

November 17, 2015

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Published:

November 17, 2015

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At a cost of TRY 864 million (EUR 283 million), hydro systems Kadıncık 1 and Kadıncık 2, located in Mersin in the south of the country, were bought at a tender by IC İçtaş Energy Investment Holding, Anadolu Agency’s Energy Terminal said.

The installed capacity is 70 MW in Kadıncık 1 and 56 MW in the second power plant. In total, 10 companies applied for the tender. The first offer in the tender round started at EUR 255 million and was followed by four elimination rounds. After the elimination rounds, the qualifying companies then proceeded to open bidding, the article said.

The opening bid started with an offer of EUR 281.58 million. IC İçtaş Energy has total installed capacity of 1.33 GW, entirely based on hydro sources for the domestic market, Energy Terminal said.

 

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