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E.ON gets EUR 2 million in damages from government

Published

August 24, 2015

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Published:

August 24, 2015

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After a legal dispute at the arbitration court in Paris against E.ON, Romanian state lost the case because of claims being overdue and is obliged to pay the German energy group EUR 2 million in compensation. The government had accused E.ON of not having made the investments promised in the privatization contract of the former Electrica Moldova, Romania-Insider reported. The state then asked the company to pay EUR 33 million, but the court in Paris ruled in favor of the other party, Capital.ro said.

The government in Bucharest also has other legal disputes with international companies that took over electricity distributors. Romania also went to court against Enel, demanding EUR 500 million in compensation. The state claims that the Italian energy company, which took over Electrica Muntenia Sud, didn’t respect the privatization contract.

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