Electricity

Bojanić: Montenegro in talks to extend deadline for shutting down TPP Pljevlja

coal-phaseout-montenegro

Photo: TPP Pljevlja (EPCG)

Published

January 27, 2021

Country

Comments

0

Share

Published:

January 27, 2021

Country:

Comments:

0

Share

Montenegrin authorities are negotiating a new deadline for shutting down thermal power plant (TPP) Pljevlja, which has already used up its 20,000 operating hours allowed until the end-2023 under the Energy Community’s regulations, according to Mladen Bojanić, minister for capital investment in Montenegro’s new government.

“This is what we found as soon as we took over,” said Bojanić, adding that all the allocated operating hours had been used up, instead of being stretched out until 2023 to allow for an overhaul of TPP Pljevlja in the meantime.

Montenegro’s new government must urgently overhaul TPP Pljevlja

Montenegro’s new government must urgently overhaul TPP Pljevlja, Bojanić said in a meeting with businesspeople, and he warned that the power plant’s closure would have a grave economic impact.

In mid-2020, state power utility Elektroprivreda Crne Gore (EPCG) signed an agreement on an environmental overhaul of TPP Pljevlja, worth over EUR 54 million, with the DEC International-Bemax-BB Solar-Permontea consortium. The project should extend the plant’s lifespan by 30 years and greatly reduce its impact on the environment.

In July, the Energy Community Secretariat estimated that TPP Pljevlja’s sole power generation unit would be the first of ten in the region to use up the allocated 20,000 operating hours, and that this would happen as early as November 2020.

In October, Montenegrin non-governmental organization Green Home called on the authorities to disclose whether TPP Pljevlja would consume its remaining allowed operating hours in about 20 days and whether the country had requested additional hours from the Energy Community.

TPP Pljevlja accounts for nearly 40% of EPCG’s electricity output

The 225 MW power plant makes up 25% of EPCG’s generation capacities, but it accounts for nearly 40% of the company’s electricity output. Its sole power generation unit is one of ten in the Energy Community Contracting Parties operating under the opt-out regime, which allows for exempting certain coal-fired power plants from compliance with the EU’s Large Combustion Plants Directive (LCPD).

The LCPD sets emission limit values for SO2, NOx, and dust from existing plants. According to Green Home, TPP Pljevlja may continue to operate only if it brings its technology into line with the EU’s standards and the Industrial Emissions Directive’s (IED) requirements for new plants.

Comments (0)

Be the first one to comment on this article.

Enter Your Comment
Please wait... Please fill in the required fields. There seems to be an error, please refresh the page and try again. Your comment has been sent.

Related Articles

Solutions for energy poverty in Energy Community study

Solutions for energy poverty in Energy Community – study

08 December 2021 - Efforts to address energy poverty in the region are part of the Energy Community Just Transition Initiative

Etmax gets concession for Nevesinje solar power plant

Etmax gets concession for Nevesinje solar power plant

07 December 2021 - The Government of the Republic Srpska has instructed the Ministry of Energy and Mining to conduct the procedure for granting a concession

Price of CO2 hits all-time high above EUR 80 per ton

Price of CO2 hits all-time high above EUR 80 per ton

06 December 2021 - The price of permits for emitting CO2 has increased 140 percent in 2021.

GEK Terna raise EUR 300 million via green bonds obligation cut emissions

GEK Terna to raise EUR 300 million via green bonds with obligation to cut emissions

06 December 2021 - Greek construction and energy giant GEK Terna is preparing to sell common sustainability-linked bonds with a target of EUR 300 million